AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Free Dating
Fernando09
23-year-old Male
Seeking Women: 18 - 45
Fort Smith, Arkansas
United States
Last Activity: > 3 months ago

Aries Aries
send mail forward to friend
send wink print profile
add to favorites report abuse
add to friends post shoutout

headline
Hey my name is Fernando and I'm single!

About myself
Do not a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem t

The person I would like to meet

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

About my work

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What do you like to do for fun/hobbies?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

My idea of a great date

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

If you are divorced/widower, you can talk about how that happened here.

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to st

What is your fantasy vacation?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What is your academic background?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Where did you last vacation and did you like it?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What do you find attractive in people?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What do others do that irritate you?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What do you think is your best quality?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What one thing would you change about your personality if you could?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What one question would you want answered in an initial email from another member?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Describe your physique.

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What is the favorite thing you like sexually done to you?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What fantasy(s) are you still waiting to experience?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

What fantasy(s) have you already experienced?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Do you have any STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases)?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Are you looking for a one night stand, to play for a while, or a long-term Adult relationship?

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Free Space. Say anything you want!

In a recent "New York Times" article, Leonard Mlodinow told the charming story of a father, his son, and a ballgame at old Yankee Stadium. It took place on a July day in 1945, as soldiers were returning from World War II.

Some of the former men-in-arms coming home to the United States were men who had been professional baseball players. Although it is hard for us to imagine now, star athletes left their careers to be citizen-soldiers in those awful days. Such famous ballplayers as Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn, Stan Musial, Yogi Berra, and Phil Rizzuto answered their country's call. And there was no more famous baseball player who donned the uniform than Joe DiMaggio.

On this particular day, "Joe D" -- who had his record 56-game hitting streak in 1941 -- was trying to be simply a fan at the game with his four-year-old son, Joe Jr., before rejoining his old team and playing for the pleasure of the crowds again. But someone seated nearby in the mezzanine recognized him.

Within a matter of minutes, the buzz had spread through the stands. Then a chant began. "Joe, Joe, Joe DiMaggio!" they repeated. In his typical style, a moved DiMaggio nodded to his admirers and looked down to see if his son had noticed the spontaneous acknowledgment that had more attention now than the game being played on the field.

Sure enough, the four-year-old Joe Jr. had noticed. "See, Daddy," said the little DiMaggio, "everybody knows me!"

I call the story charming because it illustrates the way small children read the world. They are ego-centric and believe everything revolves around them. Who can fault them? They are children, immature, and understandably self-absorbed.

The same trait in adults, though, is anything but "charming." Part of the business of growing up is to understand "It's not about me" and to "Get over yourself!" The sad fact is that more and more of us seem to struggle these days with growing up and relinquishing the idea that it really is all abou

Copy & paste to friend: (Click inside box; Ctrl + C to copy; Ctrl + V to paste)

*WARNING* AdultMatchdoctor does not screen its members. It is very important that you read our safety warning before you communicate with any of our members. Profiles from Non-English speaking countries have their own special section on the safety warning page, make sure to read it if you are responding to such profiles!

*18 U.S.C. 2257* This website is exempt from 18 U.S.C. 2257.  This website does not produce visual depictions of actual sexual conduct, but is a mere hosting service/distributor of classified dating ads that may contain such photos submitted by our members. Read more here.

free dating | mission statement | testimonials | safety warning | report abuse | safe list | privacy | legal | 2257 | advertise | link to us

© Copyright 2000-2014 Online Singles, LLC.
OS-WEB02